Cardigan Lodge

In this 1922 picture of Newmarket High Street, Cardigan Lodge is the first building on the right, with two people standing outside. It would have been the surgery of Dr Sidney Winslow Woollett at that time (see below), which is perhaps why the blinds are closed in the middle of the day? (see below or click image for more on the source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 1).

In this 1922 picture of Newmarket High Street, Cardigan Lodge is the first building on the right, with two people standing outside. It would have been the surgery of Dr Sidney Winslow Woollett at that time (see below), which is perhaps why the blinds are closed in the middle of the day? (see below or click image for more on the source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 1).

Cardigan Lodge is in the High Street, on the corner with The Avenue (currently T T nails and Cambridge Kitchens). It’s part of an interesting historically important much larger mansion, which at first glance is not obvious, but becomes clearer when pointed out, and is easier to see in older pictures like the one on the right. The building has a large central section characterised by four windows on the upper floors at the front. Either side are two wings, each with three front upper windows. Cardigan Lodge is the wing on the right, the section with two people standing outside in the image on the right. Interestingly, the entrance to that wing appears to have been from The Avenue historically – the Cambridge Kitchens entrance today (The Avenue wasn’t built until the turn of the 19th/20th century, but there was some form of roadway there before, as shown by an image from the 1885 OS town plan below, which also shows the side entrance very clearly). The 1911 census in the references further below suggests that the entrance was from The Avenue too, as do references from 1926 and likely 1851 also.

Cardigan Lodge appears to have been one of several Newmarket buildings used as a surgery by more than one practice at different points in history (the other examples being Mentmore House, Kingston House, Rous Villa, and possibly Brackley House and Cheveley House). Cardigan Lodge was definitely used by the predecessors of Oakfield Surgery in the late 19th / early 20th century, and likely also by the predecessors of The Rookery Medical Centre in the mid 19th century – certainly the latter were somewhere in the larger mansion at least.

Cardigan Lodge on the 1885 Town Plan, clearly showing the side entrance (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 2).

Cardigan Lodge on the 1885 Town Plan, clearly showing the side entrance (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 2).

It’s not known exactly when the larger mansion was built. It appears to be on Chapman’s 1787 map of Newmarket, although it’s not entirely clear whether what’s shown is a row of earlier structures, the outline looking a little different. On that map the stables immediately behind are marked as where Thomas Panton kept his horses. There were two generations of Thomas Panton in Newmarket. Thomas Panton senior became ‘Keeper of his Majesty’s Running Horses at Newmarket’ in 1728. A very long and complicated Abstract of Title from 1862 chronicles the Pantons’ estate, including this mansion, passing through William Crockford to William Parr Isaacson, who put his estate up for sale in 1884. The sale documents from that time show Cardigan Lodge clearly marked, but also that this part of the building was not owned by William Parr Isaacson by that stage (see image below). When Cardigan Lodge became separated off is not clear. It became known as Cardigan Lodge because it was the Newmarket residence of the Countess of Cardigan, who apparently acquired it from her uncle Admiral Henry John Rous in 1877.

1884 brochure, showing Cardigan Lodge and surrounding properties (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 3).

1884 brochure, showing Cardigan Lodge and surrounding properties (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 3).

The 1851 and 1861 censuses show the Newmarket medics Floyd Minter Peck followed by William Henry Day residing in part of this large mansion. Dr Day is key to pinning down which part of the building they likely occupied. Obviously it was not called Cardigan Lodge at that stage, since the Countess of Cardigan was yet to live there. William Day’s address in the early 1860s was 3 Park Terrace, and ‘Park Terrace’ was the name for this part of the High Street on the 1871 census (not to be confused with ‘The Terrace’ further west on the other side of what was later to become The Avenue). Going from east to west, the 1861 census shows Richard Faircloth’s House (see the page on Richard Faircloth, the small building to the right of Willoughby House on the plan above), followed by Willoughby House (named on this census – where the Post Office is now), then three further households apparently corresponding to the larger mansion: one uninhabited, one occupied by a Bryant family, then the third by William Henry Day, so fitting well with his address, 3 Park Terrace. Next there’s a housekeeper, apparently in a separate residence. After that comes Harry Hall the artist in Park Cottage, which was attached to a large house at the bottom of The Terrace inhabited by the Hammond banking family for many years (now Godolphin House – Park Cottage no longer exists). The 1871 census similarly shows Richard Faircloth, followed by someone in what must be Willoughby House, then three further residences (although the border between Willoughby House and the first is a little unclear), a housekeeper on her own, then Harry Hall followed by the Hammonds. The 1881 census shows Richard Faircloth’s successor in his old house, followed by someone in Willoughby House, then three further households before an unoccupied Park Lodge (i.e. Cottage) next door to the Hammonds. On that census, the third residence is again occupied by a housekeeper alone and is this time named as Cardigan Lodge. So it seems that the single housekeeper is associated with the third residence along, and that this was likely 3 Park Terrace, William Henry Day’s residence, later Cardigan Lodge. This fits well with the 1884 plan above, showing Willoughby House, followed by three residences occupying the original large mansion (two combined to make the ‘Club Chambers’ at that stage, the third being Cardigan Lodge – note the likely side entrance to Cardigan Lodge on that plan too), then Park Cottage followed by the Hammond’s residence. This also would make sense of Cardigan Lodge being used as a surgery again later in the century (which it definitely was – see below). Obviously Floyd Minter Peck likely occupied the same building as his successor William Henry Day, especially as theirs was a brief handover partnership (see the pages on Floyd Minter Peck, William Henry Day, The Rookery practice chain and selected references below for details). The 1851 census appears to have the households slightly out of sequence, but most likely it shows Floyd Peck in 3 Park Terrace, all things considered (see census details in the references below). It’s of note that the rest of the mansion appears to have been uninhabited on the 1851 census, and Floyd Peck’s residence was described as adjoining an uninhabited house in a newspaper report from later that same year. Earlier than this the Pecks’ practice had been in Mentmore House at the other end of the High Street, which was put up for sale in 1850 – see the pages on Robert James Peck (Floyd’s father, whose practice he continued), Floyd Minter Peck, The Pecks, Mentmore House and The Rookery Practice chain for more details. William Henry Day moved the practice from 3 Park Terrace to Lushington House on ‘The Terrace’ in 1861/2 (marked as Dr Gray on the plan above, who was his successor there). So it appears Cardigan Lodge was inhabited by this practice for just over a decade: Floyd Minter Peck from about 1850 to early 1858, then William Henry Day from late 1857 to 1861/2, before he moved up the road to where Dr Gray is shown on the 1884 brochure above.

There followed a long interlude during which Cardigan Lodge was associated with Admiral Henry John Rous (see the Rous Memorial Hospital also). As mentioned above, his niece the Countess of Cardigan took on the house from him in 1877, hence its name. She sold it in 1895, then Cardigan Lodge is mentioned as a surgery again from 1899.

The 1891 census shows Walter Hutchinson’s practice further west along the High Street, in the little building east of Willoughby House on the 1884 plan above (where Richard Faircloth was on the earlier censuses – who he’d succeeded, via John Rowland Wright – see The Oakfield practice chain). However, by the time of the 1901 census Walter Hutchinson had moved his practice to Cardigan Lodge. It’s not marked as Cardigan Lodge on that census but Walter Hutchinson’s Medical Directory entry names his residence as Cardigan Lodge from 1899 onwards (although he might have been there from a little earlier). He continued to practise from Cardigan Lodge until retiring due to ill health in 1903 (dying in Devon in 1905), but not before Sidney Winslow Woollett had succeeded to his practice.

The Avenue in 1905, showing some activity outside Cardigan Lodge, when it would have been the surgery of Dr Woollett (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 4).

The Avenue in 1905, showing some activity outside Cardigan Lodge, when it would have been the surgery of Dr Woollett (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 4).

Dr Woollett continued at Cardigan Lodge until 1927, then moved to Kingston House, where he died in 1928, to be succeeded by Joe Davis his assistant. Dr Davis later moved this practice to Rous Villa, where many will remember Rous Surgery, which became Oakfield Surgery in 1993 (again see The Oakfield practice chain). So in 1927 Cardigan Lodge ceased to be a surgery for the second time, after another three decades in such use.

It will be interesting to see if any documents come to light in the future associated with the Countess Cardigan or Admiral Rous indicating that their residence was used as a surgery earlier in its existence, or that it was called 3 Park Terrace. It’s of note that before Admiral Rous, and after the Countess Cardigan, the building was probably not owned by its medical occupants Peck, Day, Hutchinson then Woollett, but likely leased. It would be very helpful to see the old deeds if they exist, but to date they have not come to light despite making enquiries in the obvious places. It is however known that Lady Stamford bought Cardigan Lodge in 1895, uniting the whole original mansion, then sold it in 1897 along with the rest of the mansion and associated properties to Mr R. McCalmont.

Since its time as a surgery Cardigan Lodge has been a decorating shop and currently is occupied by T T nails and Cambridge Kitchens.

 

Image sources and acknowledgements:-

Image 1: From The Francis Frith Collection; image ©, reproduced with kind permission of The Francis Frith Collection, www.francisfrith.com. [Note: click here for the specific image on their website.]

Image 2: Town Plan of Newmarket. Southampton: Ordnance Survey; 1885 (cropped); image © Crown Copyright 1885, reproduced with kind permission of old-maps.co.uk and the Ordnance Survey. [Note: click here for the specific map on their website.]

Image 3: Estate Plan of William Parr Isaacson, Newmarket, from the sale particulars brochure, 1884, reference R114/013 (cropped); image ©, reproduced with kind permission of the Cambridgeshire Archives. [Note: this appears previously to have been called RH114/013, see references below.]

Image 4: From Peter Norman’s Collection (cropped); image reproduced with kind permission of Peter Norman. [Note: we have not been able to access the back of this old postcard to ascertain the original publisher, but using the image here seems likely acceptable, especially given the card’s age. Please make contact using the details via the footer below if you know more, for example if further acknowledgements etc. are required.]

Note: see comments regarding images and copyright © etc. on the Usage &c. page as well. 

Relevant references in chronological order

1728, 14th March: ‘March 14. Thomas Panton, Esq; Equerry to his Ma-jesty, appointed Keeper of his Majesty’s Running Hor-ses at Newmarket…’ Reference: Green CH. THE Historical Register, Containing An Impartial RELATION of all TRANSACTIONS, Foreign and Domestic. WITH A Chronological Diary OF ALL The remarkable OCCURRENCES, viz. Births, Marriages, Deaths, Removals, Promotions, &c. that happen’d in this Year: Together with the Characters and Parentage of Persons deceased, of emi-nent Rank. London: R Nutt; 1728 (In the Chronological Diary section, page 18). [Note: interestingly this book appears to use our modern dating method, defining the New Year for 1728 as starting from 1st January, not 25th March (see New Year change); presumably the idea must have been in circulation before it was adopted, so this appears to have been an example of that?]

1787: Large building visible on Chapman’s map of Newmarket from 1787, in front of ‘stables where the horses belonging to’ Thomas Panton were kept. Reference: SRO(B)435, ‘Plan of the Town of Newmarket, surveyed by I. Chapman London: Printed for W Faden. Geogr. to the King Charing Cross March 31 1787’, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).

1841, 7th June: On the relevant part of the High Street, immediately west of Richard Faircloth, is Molly Norton in what we know was Willoughby House, where the post office is now (see the page on Walter Norton for details). There are then just three names before the large household of Rev. Plumpton Wilson, which appears likely to have been the large house at the bottom of the Terrace (later the Hammonds’ residence, now Godolphin House). The three names are all servants, one in what’s marked as ‘Crockford’s yard’ (see 1862 abstract of title below). So it seems likely that the whole house, at this stage owned by William Crockford, was empty aside from three servants taking care of it. Reference: The National Archives, 1841 census.

1850, 27th March: Notice regarding the auction on 8th and 9th April of the late Robert James Peck’s household furniture (including 250 volumes of books) and ‘freehold family residence situate in the High Street, Newmarket’, described as a ‘spacious dwelling-house’ and ‘for many years in the occupation of the said Robert James Peck £1000 may remain on mortgage. Possession may be had immediately after the sale’. Reference: The Bury and Norwich Post. Wednesday Mar 27 1850: 3. [Note: this was Mentmore House, but included here as likely Floyd (see next reference below) was in Mentmore House until this sale.]

1851, 30th/31st March: Floyd M Peck, aged 30, described as a general practitioner and deputy coroner for Cambridgeshire, with qualifications listed also. The household also contained his wife, two daughters, sister Martha aged 19, a visitor, three domestic servants, and Thomas John Kennett aged 22, who was originally from Dover in Kent and described as a pupil and student of medicine. All Saints’ parish, Newmarket. Reference: The National Archives, 1851 census. [Note: the census here seems to be out of sequence, as if the enumerator went from Richard Faircloth’s House, past an unoccupied Willoughby House and the larger mansion (at that stage likely owned by the William Parr Isaacson who was in Great Yarmouth on this census) to Henry/Harry Hall’s residence (named Park Cottage/Lodge on later censuses) then tuned back to enumerate William Taylor a carpenter (who was perhaps in ‘Crockford’s Yard’ – see 1841 above) then the Pecks on the end of the large otherwise unoccupied mansion (see December 1851 below), followed by the Hammond banking family, who were in the next big house on the 1861 census, so likely were in the same place on this one too – this sequence is also easier to understand when the likely side entrance to 3 Park Terrace / Cardigan Lodge is considered too.]

1851, December: ‘NEWMARKET.- Robbery and Confession.- On Thursday night week, the establishment of Mr. Peck, surgeon, of this town, was thrown into an unusual state of excitement… the adjoining house, which is uninhabited…’ Reference: The Cambridge Independent Press. Saturday Dec 20 1851: 3. [Note: see the page on Floyd Minter Peck for the full Story.]

1857, 25th September: Mr. Floyd Minter Peck, Newmarket Medical Officer of District no. 3… named his Partner Dr. William Henry Day as his substitute in case of absence &c’. Reference:611/21, Newmarket Union Minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: this is the earliest mention of William Day in Newmarket. He was single at this point so likely lived with the Pecks, taking on the house and marrying later that year.]

1858:DAY, WM. HENRY, 3, Park-terr. Newmarket, Cambs. (Peck and Day)- M.D. St. And. 1857; M.R.C.S. Eng. 1854; L.S.A. 1857; late Asst.-Surg. H.M. 3rd Foot.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1858.

1858, 15th January:Mr. Peck’s resignation of medical district no. 3 was received and accepted when the Board resolved to proceed to the election of his successor… Dr. Day Mr. Peck’s deputy to be requested to attend the sick poor in the mean time until the election.’ Reference:611/21, Newmarket Union Minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).

1858, 9th February:Mr. Day, successor to the practice of Mr. Peck….’ Reference: The Bury and Norwich Post. Tuesday Feb 9 1858: 3. [Note: see the pages on Floyd Minter Peck and William Henry Day for more details.]

1861:DAY, Wm. HENRY, 3, Park-terr. Newmarket, Cambs.- M.D. St. And. 1857; M.R.C.S. Eng. 1854; L.S.A. 1857; late Asst.-Surg. H.M. 3rd Foot.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1861.

1861, 7/8th April: William H. Day aged 30, ‘(M.D.) General Practitioner’ born in Wantage, Berkshire, together with his wife Emma, newborn son with ‘Monthly Nurse’, who would have been in connection with the son, not a medical nurse, a cook, housemaid and footman, living in what’s thought to be the later Cardigan Lodge (3 Park Terrace) in the High Street. Recorded separately is Louisa Cooper, a housekeeper, thought likely associated with the Days (see rationale in the main text above). Reference: The National Archives, 1861 census. [Note: see the page on William Henry Day for an image.], [Note also, the house is not called 3 Park Terrace on the census or Cardigan Lodge (a later name) but is thought to have been that property – again, see the rationale in the main text above. West of the Days is Harry Hall, shown in Park Cottage, followed by the Hammonds in the next big house (as on the previous and subsequent censuses). Going east are two households before the Isaacsons in Willoughby House, which is named (the Bryants and one marked un-inhabited – likely 2 then 1 Park Terrace, making the original mansion 1, 2 and 3 Park Terrace).]

1862:DAY, WILLIAM HENRY, Lushington House, Newmarket, Cambs. – M.D. St. And. 1857; L.R.C.P. 1861; M.R.C.S. Eng. 1854; L.S.A. 1857…’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1862. [Note: see the page on William Henry Day for more details.]

1862: ‘Abstract of the Title of Mr William Parr Isaacson to an Estate at Newmarket late Crockfords’ starts with ‘As to that part of the Estate formerly Pantons’ and mentions ‘T Panton the father’ in relation to a ‘Mansion House’. There follows 46 pages of complex legal language essentially detailing how the estate passed from the Pantons, through William Crockford to William Parr Isaacson (see 1884 below for what happened next). Reference: HB517/A/51, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).

1869: ‘Rous Admiral Hon. Henry John, High street, & 13 Berkeley square, London w’ listed in the Newmarket, Private Residents section of The Post Office Directory. Reference: The Post Office Directory of Cambridge, Norfolk and Suffolk. London: Kelly and Co.; 1869, pg 78.

1871, 2nd/3rd April: On this census the still as yet un-named Cardigan Lodge appears as Part of Park Terrace and occupied by Mary Bottom a 50 year old farmer’s widow, her niece, a couple of servants and the apparently associated Ann Catchpole a 31 year old housekeeper. Reference: The National Archives, 1871 census. [Note: east of this household were two further households (likely 1 and 2 Park Terrace) before what corresponds to Willoughby House (although the border between that house and the mansion is a little unclear) then Richard Faircloth’s residence. Harry Hall the artist then the Hammonds were to the west.]

1881, 3rd/4th April: Caroline Tweed, aged 59, a housekeeper, living in Cardigan Lodge. Reference: The National Archives, 1881 census. [Note: this is the first census to name the building as Cardigan Lodge. Immediately to the east was ‘Park Lodge’, which was uninhabited, followed by the Hammonds at the bottom of the Terrace. To the west, the rest of the old mansion is shown divided into two, named Bolton House followed by Panton House, then comes Willoughby House, followed by John Wright, Richard Faircloth’s successor (in the latter’s old residence).], [Note also, it’s interesting that the complex 1862 abstract of title mentioned above includes mention on the first page of a Charles Duke of Bolton in relation to Thomas Panton’s Mansion House.]

1883: ‘Cardigan Countess of, Cardigan lodge’ listed in the Newmarket, Cambridgeshire Private Residents section of Kelly’s Directory. Reference: Kelly’s directory of Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. London: Kelly and Co.; 1883, pg 99.

1884: A brochure for the Sale of William Parr Isaacson’s estate (three copies with annotations and diagrams), including Lot 2: ‘The Two Noble Mansions in High Street, recently occupied as a Club House AND KNOWN AS “BOLTON” and “PANTON” HOUSES.’ Reference: EF506/10/6a, EF506/10/6b and HE500/4/1-28, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds); a similar brochure is in RH114/013, (Cambridgeshire County Record Office [called Cambridgeshire Archives], Cambridge – subsequently relocated to Ely). [Note: see image of the plan above.]

1891, 5th/6th April: Cardigan Lodge is named and shown as uninhabited on this census. Reference: The National Archives, 1891 census. [Note: interestingly only one household seems to be shown occupying the whole of the rest of the mansion on this census, headed up by a housekeeper and called Stamford House – so the rest of the mansion (i.e. Bolton and Panton Houses on the 1884 sales brochure and 1881 census above – see also 1897 below, which would appear to explain this). Next, to the west, comes Willoughby House followed by Walter Hutchinson in Richard Faircloth’s old house, one of his later successors (and see 1901 below).]

1892: ‘Cardigan Countess of, Cardigan lodge’ (marked * denoting non-residents) listed in the Newmarket, Cambridgeshire Private Residents section of Kelly’s Directory. Reference: Kelly’s directory of Cambridgeshire. London: Kelly & Co., Limited; 1892, pg 129.

1895, 15th May: ‘SALE OF CARDIGAN LODGE.– On Wednesday morn-ing acting under instructions from the Countess of Cardigan and Lancastre [sic]… offered for sale by auction… the freehold property known as Cardigan Lodge, situated in High-street, Newmarket with stabling, boxes, and exercise yard… the property was secured… by the Countess of Stamford and Warrington…’ Reference: The Bury and Norwich Post. Tuesday May 21 1895: 3. [Note: she apparently had secured the rest of the mansion earlier, and owned Willoughby House too – see the 1891 census above and 1897 below.]

1897: ‘Lady Stamford, who several months ago sold her paddocks to Mr. R. McCalmont, this property including Stam-ford House, Cardigan Lodge, Willoughby House and the Park Paddocks Estate’. Reference: The Sporting Life. Wednesday Jun 23 1897: 4. [Note: it’s interesting that Lady Stamford re-united the original mansion as a whole, and at this point sold it on as such, along with associated properties.]

1897:WYKES, WILLIAM HY., High-st. Newmarket – M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. Lond. 1896; (Middlx. Hosp.)’. Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1897. [Note: this was his first entry in the Medical Directory. It stays essentially the same until he moved on in 1902, except he added ‘Cardigan Lodge’ in 1900 (and 1901), and see the 1900 Kelly’s Directory and 1901 census below also.]

1899:HUTCHINSON, WALTER, Cardigan Lodge, Newmarket, Cambs – M.R.C.S. Eng. 1875; (King’s Coll.); Mem. Cambs Med. Soc.; Med. Off. and Pub. Vacc. 2nd Dist. Newmarket Union; Med Ref. Nat. Prov. and other Insur. Cos.; late Surg. U.S. Mail Line, and P. & O. Co. Contrib. “Rare Case of Intesti-nal Obstruction of 39 days’ duration – Recovery,” Lancet, 1880; “Case of Complete Inversion of the Uterus,” Ibid. 1889.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1899. [Note: this is the first time that he mentioned Cardigan Lodge, before that not specifying a particular house, just mentioning Newmarket, although his entry had not been updated since 1897.]

1901, 31st March / 1st April: Walter Hutchinson, aged 48, ‘surgeon’, born in Leominster, with his wife Rosa M, aged 39, born in Kettering, son Thomas, aged 10, William H. Wykes, aged 31 ‘surgeon’ and ‘worker’, and two servants, living in Newmarket High Street. Reference: The National Archives, 1901 census. [Note: oddly there are no residences shown in between this entry and the Grays in Lushington House, but we know that this was Cardigan Lodge from his Medical Directory entries – see 1899 above and comments on William Wykes’ 1897 entry. As on the 1891 census above, the rest of the mansion appears to have been one property, cared for by a housekeeper, the next property to the west after that being headed up by a Mrs Dawson who bought Willoughby House according to pencil notes on one of the 1884 sales brochures. Reference: H500/4/1-28, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).], [Note also, see the page on Walter Hutchinson for more details.]

1903, 6th October: ‘A letter dated 5th instant was read from Walter Hutchinson in No2 District that he had taken Mr S. W. Woollett M.R.C.S, L.S.A. into partnership and asking that he may be appointed as his deputy for Public Vaccination and as District Medical Officer / It was resolved that the application be granted…’ Reference: 611/39, Newmarket Union minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).

1903, 17th November: ‘The following letter was read from Dr Walter Hutchinson resigning his appointment as Medical Officer of the No2 District / Stourfield Park Sanatorium / Bournemouth / 4th Novr 1903 / Dear Sir, / It is with great regret that I write to place my resignation of medical officer of the Second District of the Newmarket Union in the hands of the Guardians my health has so completely broken down that there is no chance of my being able to do any work for many months my partner + successor Dr Woollett has been performing my duties since my illness + I feel sure that if the Guardians appoint him to the post they will find him a very efficient officer. And in conclusion I should like to thank the Guardians for many acts of courtesy + kindness that I have received at their hands / Believe me / Faithfully yours / Walter Hutchinson…’ Reference: 611/39, Newmarket Union minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: see the page on Walter Hutchinson for more details, and the next reference below. He died in 1905, in Devon], [Note also, this appears to have been yet another example of a short handover partnership, of which there are many examples – see The practice chains of Newmarket.]

1903, 17th November: After the above reference: ‘The following application for the appointment as medical officer for No2 District was read from Mr S. W. Woollett / Newmarket / Nov 6 1903 / Sir / I beg to apply for the post of medical officer to the No2 District of the Newmarket Union, as Mr Hutchinson informs me that he has resigned this appointment, including the duties of Public Vaccinator. I have been in practice 25 years and I am well acquainted with the routine duties of a Poor Law appointment as I have been on a Public Health Committee of a Town Council for some years I understand the working of the Public Health and Vaccination Acts – I attend at a Surgery at Dullingham two afternoon [sic] a week where I am able to attend to Parish Patients – / I remain / Yours faithfully / Sidney winslow woollett [sic] / MRCS Eng LSA London’. Reference: 611/39, Newmarket Union minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: see the next reference below, from the same page of the minute book.]

1903, 17th November: After the above reference: ‘unanimously resolved that Sidney Winslow Woollett MRCS Eng LSA London of Cardigan Lodge Newmarket be and he is hereby appointed as Medical Officer and Public Vaccinator of the No2 District of the Union…’ Reference: 611/39, Newmarket Union minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: see the two references above.]

1904:WOOLLETT, SIDNEY WINSLOW, Cardigan House, Newmarket– M.R.C.S. Eng. 1879; L.S.A. 1878; (King’s Coll.); Mem. Brit. Med. Assoc.; J.P. for Southwold, late Asst. Med. Off. Middlx. Co. Asyl. Banstead, Peckham House Asyl., and Sussex and Branden-burgh House, Hammersmith.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1904. [Note: this was his first appearance at Newmarket in the Medical Directory – it’s odd that he still mentions his JP role in Southwold despite having updated the rest of the entry? He mentions this up to 1907. His last entry was in 1928, see below.], [Note also, his Medical Register entry records ‘Cardigan lodge’ not house, lodge being the usual name for this building, as the rest of this page shows.]

1904:Woollett Sidney Winslow M.R.C.S.Eng., L.S.A.Lond. physician & surgeon, & medical officer & public vac-cinator No. 2 district, Cardigan lodge’ listed in the Newmarket Commercial section of Kelly’s Directory. Reference: Kelly’s directory of Cambridgeshire. London: Kelly’s Directories Ltd.; 1904, pgs 184-192 Newmarket section. [Note: Crompton Ernest, Fyson Ernest Last, Gray Clement Frederick, and Maund John Hansby are listed separately.]

1904, 31st May: ‘An application was received from Dr Walter Hutchinson… enclosing a Medical Certificate of permanent disablement and applying for a Superannuation Allowance’. Reference: 611/39, Newmarket Union minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: see the page on Walter Hutchinson for more details. He died in 1905 in Devon.]

1911, 2nd/3rd April: Sidney Winslow Woollett, aged 54, ‘surgeon’, living with his wife Florrie Ada aged 36, son Henry Winslow Woollett aged 15, a visitor and two servants at Cardigan Lodge, interestingly defined as ‘the avenue’ in Newmarket. Reference: The National Archives, 1911 census. [Note: Stamford House, on Newmarket High Street in this census, appears to represent the rest of the mansion. It’s recorded as having 29 rooms with only three servants resident at the time of the census. It’s recorded in between Willoughby House and Godolphin House on the High Street, with Cardigan Lodge (which should be in between Stamford House to which it was attached and Godolphin House on the other side of The Avenue) not recorded in the High Street because it’s recorded as part of The Avenue, where it has an entrance (see images above, and 1926 below also).]

1925:Woollett Sidney Winslow O.B.E., M.R.C.S. Eng., L.S.A. Lond. Surgeon, & medical officer & public vaccinator No. 2 district, Cardigan lodge, High street. T N 18’ listed in the Newmarket Commercial section of Kelly’s Directory. Reference: Kelly’s directory of Suffolk and Essex. London: Kelly’s Directories Ltd.; 1925, pgs 361-370 Newmarket section. [Note: the Grays and Hendley, and John Maund are listed separately.]

1926:Woollett, Dr. S. W., Car-digan Lodge’ listed under The Avenue, not the High Street. Reference: Telephone, Street and commercial Directory of Newmarket. Bury St Edmund’s: F.G. Pawsey & Co. Ltd.; 1926, pg 65. [Note: it’s interesting that he’s listed under The Avenue and not the High Street, suggesting that he likely used the entrance on The Avenue. It seems likely that this was the main entrance to the Cardigan Lodge surgery going back to the time of Floyd Peck, and goes some way to explaining the 1851 census appearing out of sequence.]

1927:WOOLLETT, SIDNEY WINSLOW, O.B.E., Cardigan Lodge, Newmarket – M.R.C.S. Eng. 1879; L.S.A. 1878; (King’s Coll.); Surg. Rous Memor. Hosp.; Med. Off. & Pub. Vacc. 2nd Dist. Newmarket Union; Med. Off. P.O.; Maj. (late R.A.M.C., twice mentioned in Gazette); Med. Off. i/c of Troops, Newmarket; Hon. Life Mem. St. John Ambl. Assn.; Mem. B.M.A., Surg.-Maj. Retired 1st Norf. V. Artill.; late Asst. Med. Off. Middlx. Co. Asyl. Banstead, Peckham House Asyl., and Sussex and Brandenburgh House, Hammersmith.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1927. [Note: this was the last year that he mentioned Cardigan Lodge – see 1928 below.]

1928:WOOLLETT, SIDNEY WINSLOW, O.B.E., Kingston House, Newmarket (Tel.18)– M.R.C.S. Eng. 1879; L.S.A. 1878; (King’s Coll.); Surg. Rous Memor. Hosp.; Med. Off. & Pub. Vacc. 2nd Dist. Newmarket Union; Maj. (late R.A.M.C., twice mentioned in Gazette); Hon. Life Mem. St. John Ambl. Assn.; Mem. B.M.A., Surg.-Maj. Retired 1st Norf. V. Artill.; late Asst. Med. Off. Middlx. Co. Asyl. Banstead, Peckham House Asyl., and Sussex and Brandenburgh House, Hammersmith.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1928. [Note: this was the first year that he mentioned Kingston House – see 1927 above.]

Some other sources consulted include:-

Newmarket Local History Society. Newmarket’s Personalities from the Past – III / Admiral The Hon. Henry John Rous (1795 – 1877). http://www.newmarketlhs.org.uk/personalities3.htm (accessed 19th May 2018).

Shops History Newmarket. http://www.newmarketshops.info/index.html. Specific page on Panton House including Cardigan Lodge: http://www.newmarketshops.info/No.105-113_High_Street.html. [Note: see this website for much more detail regarding Cardigan Lodge and the wider mansion, especially for details regarding when the house was not a surgery, and for more interesting photographs], [Note also, newmarketshops.info has been supplied with information regarding the medical history of Newmarket by the author of talkingdust.net since August 2013 (see footnotes on some of the pages, including this one). Both websites continue to be developed, and in this sense are mutually symbiotic, but regarding Cardigan Lodge specifically I am particularly grateful to this website for in 2013 helping to identify Cardigan Lodge as the likely residence for Floyd Minter Peck and William Henry Day.]

The Medical Directory. London: Churchill. [Note: this publication has been known by various titles over the years. Initially it just covered London, but from 1847 it had a wider remit, being variously known as the London and Provincial Medical Directory, The Medical Directories, The Medical Directory, etc., essentially the same work with minor variations and developments. It is usually referred to as The Medical Directory (as opposed to The Medical Register), so that is how it’s consistently referred to on talkingdust.net.]

The Medical Register. London: General Medical Council.

The Peck family Bible (see The Pecks for details). With reference to Floyd (or ffloyd) Minter Peck it records that he was the son of Robert James Peck, born 3.30am Thursday 20th April 1820, christened at St Mary’s church, Newmarket on 26th August 1820. It notes that he married Anna Maria Robertson at Hammersmith in March 1847, and that they went on to have 5 children in Newmarket: Mary Peck born 28th January 1848 at Newmarket St. Mary’s (baptised there the same day, likely because she wasn’t expected to live, but interestingly she died in Australia 81 years later), Annie Peck 1850, Alice Henrietta Peck 1851, Charles James Peck 1853, and Henry Floyd Rutherford Peck 1857 (all the Christenings from Annie in May 1851 took place at All Saints’, Newmarket, indicating that the family had moved to the south side of the High Street where Cardigan Lodge is). [Note: details taken from a transcript supplied by the Peck family and images of some original pages.]

Note: For published material referenced on this website see the ‘Acknowledgements for resources of published material’ section on the ‘Usage &c.’ page. The sources used for original unpublished documents are noted after each individual reference. Any census records are referenced directly to The National Archives, since images of these are so ubiquitous on microfilm and as digital images that they almost function like published works. Census records are covered by the ‘Open Government Licence’ as should be other such public records (see the ‘Copyright and related issues’ section on the ‘Usage &c.’ page for which references constitute public records, and any other copyright issues more generally such as fair dealing/use etc.).