Kingston House

Kingston House, which is now King’s restaurant and the back half of Moon’s toy shop, has a fascinating history primarily relating to its non-medical use. It sits in the middle of a site that, in the early 17th century, was the palace and yard of Kings James 1 then Charles I. However, the current main building known as Kingston House is thought to have been constructed in the 1750s, and is named not from its earlier royal connections but because the 18th century house was associated with the Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull! Also however, in common with several other buildings in Newmarket, Kingston House has been used as a surgery by more than one practice at different points in history (the other examples being Cardigan Lodge, Mentmore HouseRous Villa, and possibly Brackley House and Cheveley House).

A plan from 1902 showing the two halves of Kingston House in relation to the High Street and Kingston Passage - note the small surgery area shaded in pink (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 1).

A plan from 1902 showing the two halves of Kingston House in relation to the High Street and Kingston Passage – note the small surgery area shaded in pink (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 1).

Kingston house was used as a surgery by two different practices separated by a couple of decades in the first half of the 20th century, following construction of a surgery in the now King’s half in 1902. However, its earliest relevance to the medical history of Newmarket comes from 1835, when it was decided by the newly formed Newmarket Union poor law institution to use the ‘Kingston House Room’ for its board meetings. Their meetings continued there until 1837, when they started using the newly built workhouse up Exning Road instead. Presumably the ‘Kingston House Room’ was one particular room in or associated with Kingston House or its surrounding smaller buildings that was let out for meetings. An interesting advert regarding an auction of furniture in 1839 mentions the ‘Great Room’, which might have been the same. The whole site was owned by Stephen Piper at that time, who can be seen associated with the house on the 1841 and likely 1851 censuses.

From 1861 the building starts to become more clearly divided into two halves, like today. The now King’s half was lived in by James Button a solicitor (known as number 2, first shown numbered on the 1881 census). Later that half was lived in by his partner in practice John Henry Aylmer, who’s shown very clearly in that half on various documents up until 1902, and with it numbered as 2. Number 1, the now Moons half, was a ‘Ladies School’ during the 1860s. Later a farmer called Edward Gittus lived there (who interestingly from a medical history point of view was on the Newmarket Union Board of Guardians, chairman at the time of his death in 1892, so another association of the house has with that institution). After Edward Gittus, an architect named Harry Roberts lived in that half. All of these people leased the property from Robert Fenn, who was a solicitor associated with the D’Albani practice, which was based in the building to the north-west of and attached to number 1, also referred to as part of Kingston House on some records it seems, now Malton House.

The 1902 plans to convert a stable and wash house into a surgery with waiting room at Kingston House (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 2).

The 1902 plans to convert a stable and wash house into a surgery with waiting room at Kingston House (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 2).

In 1902 Robert Fenn put Kingston House up for sale (on the sale documents it’s described as Lot 1, which included both the Moons number 1 and King’s number 2 halves, but not Malton House). It seems that although it didn’t sell at auction initially, eventually John Henry Aylmer likely bought it, moved into the number 1 half himself, built a surgery in the number 2 Kings half (see the plans above and on the left), and let this to Ernest Crompton some time before 1904. (Ernest Crompton was in Mentmore House until 1902 at least – see the pages on Ernest Crompton and Mentmore House for details). He practised from Kingston House until about 1910, when he moved to Rutland House, where he can be seen on the 1911 census. His practice ceased to exist in 1922.

What happened in between 1911 and 1928 at Kingston House is not completely clear, except that the Aylmers were in the Moons number 1 side on the 1911 census, with number 2 apparently unoccupied (consistent with the paragraph above), and later in 1926 a solicitor named Cooper associated with the Button/Aylmer practice was in number 1 with the widowed Mrs Aylmer in number 2 (so having moved back into that half again). Some earlier plans relating to Malton House in 1920 suggest that the Aylmers were still living in the western Moons side (number 1) at that stage. Mr Aylmer died in 1922, so perhaps Mrs Aylmer moved back into number 2 at that stage, letting number 1 to Percy Cooper.

In 1928 Sidney Winslow Woollett moved into Kingston House, just before he died, and was succeeded in practice there by Joe Davis – see the pages on Sidney Winslow Woollett, Joseph (Joe) Davis and the Oakfield practice chain for details. It’s assumed that Drs Woollett then Davis were in the number 2 King’s half of Kingston House and used the little surgery built in 1902, but that has not yet been proven. It would obviously make sense though, and must be assumed to be the case unless proven otherwise. It would have required Mrs Aylmer to move back into number 1 again, but she had moved at least twice before, so that’s quite likely, especially if she had a new medical tenant to let the surgery half too. Percy Cooper from the number 1 half in 1926 was not in Kingston House by 1929, but Joe Davis and Mrs Aylmer were. However, it’s possible the surgery fell into alternative use and the Number 1 Moons half housed this later practice.

Either way, the fascinating Kingston House has housed two separate practices, and before that was associated with the Newmarket Union in two different ways, hence it’s inclusion here regarding the medical history of Newmarket.

Joe Davis practised from Kingston House until 1937, when he’s first mentioned at Rous Villa, Mrs Aylmer also having moved out into Malton House next door to Kingston House by that stage. The 1936 Newmarket Street Directory captures an interesting intermediate step, with Joe Davis still in Kingston House, Mrs Aylmer absent from Newmarket, and a Mr Williams in Malton House.

The remains of Kingston House Surgery in 2018, taken from Kingston Passage looking towards the High Street (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 3).

The remains of Kingston House Surgery in 2018, taken from Kingston Passage looking towards the High Street (see below or click image for source and acknowledgements etc., ref. Image 3).

From 1939 Kingston House was used as a wartime operations centre before becoming ‘The Marlborough Club’ and more recently Moon’s toyshop and King’s Restaurant. On a day in June 2018, when I was kindly permitted to explore inside King’s Restaurant, the little surgery consulting room area had become a lobby with door into the yard, and had a small flight of steps up into the main house, but more central than on the 1902 plan (there was a store cupboard where the old steps would have been, which had gone). The old waiting room area had been divided into two bedrooms (the space is bigger than it looks from the outside). There were no residual features on the inside to show that the buildings had once been used as a surgery with waiting room. Outside (see image on the right) the old waiting room window could be seen bricked up, but the door was still present (presumably bricked up on the inside where one of the bedrooms was, which I couldn’t see into because it was in use). Outside the lobby, in the yard, there was still a set of steps going down as on the plan above, in fact into an old cellar. It’s currently not known whether there are any old deeds that might shed further light on the history of the house.

 

Image sources and acknowledgements:-

Image 1: From the 1902 plans for Kingston House Surgery, reference EF506/6/1/7/100 (cropped); image ©, reproduced with kind permission of the Suffolk Record Office, Bury St Edmunds and the West Suffolk Council.

Image 2: The 1902 plans for Kingston House Surgery, reference EF506/6/1/7/100 (cropped); image ©, reproduced with kind permission of the Suffolk Record Office, Bury St Edmunds and the West Suffolk Council.

Image 3: Photograph taken in 2018, by the author of talkingdust.net.

Note: see comments regarding images and copyright © etc. on the Usage &c. page as well. 

Relevant references in chronological order

1787: Kingston House is visible as a large building in the middle of ‘old Kings yard’ marked on Chapman’s 1787 map of Newmarket. Reference: SRO(B)435, ‘Plan of the Town of Newmarket, surveyed by I. Chapman London: Printed for W Faden. Geogr. to the King Charing Cross March 31 1787’, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: the house itself is not actually labelled as being called Kingston House, but is clearly visible.]

1835, 31st December: ‘It was at this Meeting determined that the future Meetings of the Board shall, until otherwise altered be held on Friday in every week to commence at 10 O’Clock in the forenoon, at the Kingston House Room in the parish of Newmarket all saints’. Reference: 611/11, Newmarket Union Minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: this was the first meeting of the Newmarket Union – see the page on the Newmarket Union for more details.], [Note also, the interesting use of the word ‘forenoon’ for the morning, as opposed to afternoon.]

1837, 17th March: ‘Resolved that the Guardians meet at the new workhouse next Board day’. Reference: 611/11, Newmarket Union Minutes, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: so this was the last meeting of the Newmarket Union at Kingston House.]

1839, 9th December: ‘GREAT ROOM, KINGSTON HOUSE. NEWMARKET. TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, By Mr CHAPMAN, On Monday next, December the 9th, 1839, about 150 Lots of neat and modern HOUSEHOLD FUR-NITURE…’ Reference: The Bury and Norwich Post. Wednesday Dec 4 1839: 3.

1841, 7th June: The 1841 census shows Stephen Piper in Kingston House, with others in Kingston square/yard either side of him, so it’s not clear how the house was divided up that that stage. Reference: The National Archives, 1841 census. [Note: see Newmarketshops.info in the other sources consulted section below for more on the Pipers this stage in the house’s history.]

1847: Under Newmarket gentry, ‘Piper Stephen, esq. Kingston house’. Reference: Post Office Directory of the Norfolk counties; viz.:- Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Huntingdonshire, with Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, and Suffolk. London: W. Kelly and Co.; 1847, pg 1131.

1851, 30th/31st March: The location of Kingston House is not entirely clear on this census. Stephen Piper is shown. Likely he was in the same residence as 1841? Reference: The National Archives, 1851 census.

1861, 7/8th April: The 1861 census shows James Button, a solicitor, living in Kingston square (presumably in the same part of Kingston house where he was on the subsequent censuses – see below), and the other part to the west (now Moons) appears unoccupied. Reference: The National Archives, 1861 census.

1871, 2nd/3rd April: The 1871 census shows James Button, a solicitor, living in Kingston square (presumably in the same part of Kingston house where he was on the subsequent censuses, and Kingston House nearer the High Street to the west apparently used as a ‘Ladies School’, with nine 10-18 year old pupils. Reference: The National Archives, 1871 census. [Note: This school seems to have run for several years at least from Kingston House, since an advert from 1866 read, ‘Ladies’ School, / KINGSTON HOUSE, NEWMARKET. / DUTIES will be RESUMED on the 24th inst. THE Principals of this Establishment will be happy to forward their Terms to parents desirous of securing their daughters a solid English Education, with home comforts and superior advantages for the acquirement of the anguages [sic] and accomplishments, under the Tuition of The Misses MAINPRICE, Assisted by Professors and resident English and Foreign Governesses. Clerical and Professional references to the families of former and present Pupils.’ Reference: The Cambridge Chronicle and University Journal. Saturday Jan 20 1866: 5.]

1874: ‘Fenn Robert, solicitor… Kingston house’ listed in Newmarket. Reference: History, gazetteer and directory of Suffolk… Sheffield: William White; 1874, pg 387. [Note: James Button does not give a house name in this directory.]

1881, 3rd/4th April: The 1881 census shows James Button, a solicitor, apparently living in the part of Kingston House next to Kingston Passage (on this census called All Saints’ passage, i.e. it leads past Kingston House to All Saints’ Church – see also comments re James Button on the 1891 census below). Regarding the further half of Kingston House to the west, this is marked unoccupied. Both parts of the building are named Kingston Place on this census, and numbered: 1 unoccupied, 2 James Button, so consistent with the later numbering (see 1902 below and the 1911 census). Reference: The National Archives, 1881 census.

1883: ‘Fenn Robert, Kingston house, High st’ and ‘James Button, Kingston house’ listed in the Private Residents section for Newmarket, and in the Commercial section ‘Fenn, D’Albiani & Ellis, solicitors, & solicitors to the Jockey Club, Kingston house’, ‘Fenn Robert (firm, Fenn, D’Albani & Ellis), solicitor…, Kingston ho’ and ‘Button James, solicitor…’ Reference: Kelly’s directory of Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. London: Kelly and Co.; 1883, pgs 97-101 Newmarket section. [Note: since number 1 was unoccupied on the 1881 census, and Robert Fenn is described as in Kingston house here and before in 1874 above, it suggests, considering the 1896 plans below, that the building immediately in front of the western half of Kingston House and attached to number 1 was sometimes referred to as part of Kingston House too, later known as Malton House – see 1920 below.]

1891, 5th/6th April: This 1891 census shows James Button, a solicitor, apparently living in the part of Kingston House next to Kingston Passage (cf. 1904 & 1925 Kelly’s Directories below and census records in between), and Edward Gittus and household, a farmer, living in the western part (now Moons toy shop). Reference: The National Archives, 1891 census.

1892, 23rd December: Under ‘Death of Alderman Gittus. / A noted East Anglian Agriculturalist’, it was reported ‘Mr. Edward Gittus, an alderman of the Cambs County Council, and a noted agriculturalist, died on Friday at his residence, Kingston House, New-market… At the time of his decease Mr Gittus held the post of chairman of the Newmarket Board of Guardians; he had been vice-chairman of the Board prior…’ Reference: The Cambridge Independent Press. Friday Dec 30 1892: 8.

1896, September: Plans were submitted by Harry William Roberts the architect regarding new drainage relating Kingston House, his own residence. The plans label the western now Moon’s section as Kingston House, the eastern now King’s section as ‘Mr Aylmer’ and the area immediately in front of the western half of Kingston House is labelled as Messrs D’Albani and Ellis (see comments 1883 above and 1920 below also). Reference: EF506/6/1/1/16, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).

1897, 13th May: Harry W Roberts, Kingston House, named as the architect on plans for alterations to a shop on the High Street (for Harry Bullman, a Draper). Reference: EF506/6/1/2/56, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).

1897, 30th September: Plans submitted by H W Roberts the architect regarding alterations to a shop on the High Street (for Henry Bullman – the shop being on the High Street in front of Kingston House – west of the entrance) show Mr J H Aylmer in the part of Kingston House next to Kingston passage, Mr H W Roberts in the western part, and Messrs D’Albani & Ellis north-west of him, behind Mr Bullman’s shop. Reference: EF506/6/1/2/76, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).

1901, 31st March / 1st April: The 1901 census shows Kingston House occupied by Harry William Roberts and family, an architect and surveyor in one half, then John Henry Aylmer, wife and household, a solicitor, in the half next to Kingston Passage. Reference: The National Archives, 1901 census.

1902, 7th April: Sales particulars for an auction to be held on 7th April 1902, the property of the late Mr. Robert Fenn, including two ‘residences known as Nos. 1 & 2, Kingston House’, accompanied by a plan. It states that ‘No.1 was late in the occupation of Mr. H. W. Roberts, Architect’ and ‘No.2… is in the occupation of Mr. J. H. Alymer, Solicitor’. The accompanying descriptions and plan make it clear that the Aylmers were in the part next to Kingston passage, and the Roberts had been in the other half (now Moons). Reference: 1026/SP260, (Cambridgeshire County Record Office [called Cambridgeshire Archives], Cambridge – subsequently relocated to Ely). [Note: although these sales particulars are marked that the property did not sell, presumably it was bought by the Aylmers before June below.], [Note also, Malton House was excluded from the above sale.], [Note also, there were two further lots in the sale, representing the properties behind Kingston House.]

1902, 17th June: Plans submitted for J H Aylmer, Kingston House, to convert a stable and wash house in Kingston Passage, adjoining Kingston House, into a Surgery & Waiting room, retaining the existing walls and slate roof. The plans clearly label the western and eastern halves of Kingston House as numbers 1 and 2 respectively, and show the surgery attached to number 2 with stairs through a door into the dining room; the waiting room is shown with a door onto Kingston Passage. Reference: EF506/6/1/7/100, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: see images above.], [Note also, the heating is marked as a gas stove.], [Note also, the date on the actual plans is impossible to read, but apparently they came into the record office in a batch of 1902 plans, and 1902 clearly makes sense historically too.]

1902, 4th July: ‘MONDAY NEXT. NEWMARKET, SUFFOLK. Sale of Valuable Freehold Family Residence, Known as “MENTMORE HOUSE,”… as now in the occupation of Mr E. Crompton, at an ANNUAL RENTAL OF £150.’ Reference: Cambridge Daily News. Friday Jul 4 1902: 2. [Note: see the page on Mentmore House for more details from this reference.]

1904:Crompton Ernest, Kingston house’ and ‘Aylmer James Henry, Kingston house, High street’ listed in the Private Residents section of Kelly’s Directory, and in the Commercial section ‘Crompton Ernest M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.Lond. physician & surgeon, Kingston house’ and ‘Aylmer John Henry (firm, Button & Aylmer), solicitor… High st’ all obviously listed under Newmarket. Reference: Kelly’s directory of Cambridgeshire… London: Kelly’s Directories Ltd.; 1904, pg 184-192 Newmarket section. [Note: it’s of interest that James Button was a solicitor apparently in the original Aylmer half on the 1861 through to 1891 censuses – see above.]

1909, 21st April: ‘WANTED. Cook-General. housemaid kept: good character indispensable: no family.– Mrs. Crompton, Kingston House, Newmarket.’ Reference: East Anglian Daily Times. Wednesday Apr 21 1909: 8.

1911, 2nd/3rd April: The 1911 census shows only John Henry Aylmer and family in 1 Kingston House (the other half from where he was before 1902). Presumably the King’s half with surgery was empty, consistent with Ernest Crompton having moved to Rutland House by the time of this census – see the page on Ernest Crompton for details. Reference: The National Archives, 1911 census. [Note: in between Ernest Crompton moving out, presumably about 1910, and Sidney Winslow Woollett moving into Kingston House in 1928, it’s not known who occupied the King’s half.]

1919, December: Plans for some minor alterations to a nearby building show a detailed drawing of Kingston House with its gardens, giving a flavour of what the house must have looked like at the time, making it obvious why 1 and 2 Kingston House would be labelled that way. Reference: EF506/6/1/16/540, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds).

1920, August: Plans regarding Malton House occupied by Mr A Hayhoe labelled ‘late D’Albani & Ellis’ show ‘Drain from Mr Aylmer’s House’ apparently coming from the direction of the western, number 1 half of Kingston House, consistent with the 1911 census above. Reference: EF506/6/1/17/565, (Suffolk County Record Office, Bury St Edmunds). [Note: see comments 1883 and 1896 above regarding the location of D’Albani & Ellis.]

1922, 8th February: John Henry Aylmer of Kingston House, Newmarket, died. Reference: Online image of National Probate Registry entry, ancestry.co.uk (accessed 5th June 2018).

1925: ‘Aylmer Mrs. J. H. Kingston house’ and ‘Cooper Percy, Kingston house’ shown in the Newmarket Private Residents section of Kelly’s Directory. However, ‘Cooper Percy, solicitor… (firm, Button, Fitch, Aymer & Cooper)’ is shown in the Commercial section. Reference: Kelly’s directory of Suffolk & Essex (with coloured maps) 1925-6. London: Kelly’s Directories Ltd.; 1925, pg 364. [Note: see the 1926 street directory below also.], [Note also, it’s of interest that James Button was a solicitor apparently in the original Aylmer half on the 1861 through to 1891 censuses – see above.]

1926: ‘Cooper, Percy, 1, Kingston House’ and ‘Aylmer, Mrs. J. H., 2, Kingston House’ listed under Kingston Passage. Reference: Telephone, Street and commercial Directory of Newmarket. Bury St. Edmund’s: F.G. Pawsey & Co. Ltd.; 1926, pg 52. [Note: ‘Hayhoe, A., Malton House’ is also listed under Kingston Passage.]

1928:WOOLLETT, SIDNEY WINSLOW, O.B.E., Kingston House, Newmarket (Tel.18)– M.R.C.S. Eng. 1879; L.S.A. 1878; (King’s Coll.); Surg. Rous Memor. Hosp.; Med. Off. & Pub. Vacc. 2nd Dist. Newmarket Union; Maj. (late R.A.M.C., twice mentioned in Gazette); Hon. Life Mem. St. John Ambl. Assn.; Mem. B.M.A., Surg.-Maj. Retired 1st Norf. V. Artill.; late Asst. Med. Off. Middlx. Co. Asyl. Banstead, Peckham House Asyl., and Sussex and Brandenburgh House, Hammersmith.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1928. [Note: this was the first year that he mentioned Kingston House, his address having been Cardigan Lodge in 1927.]

1928, 9th June: Under the heading ‘Death of Dr. S. Winslow Woollett’ the Newmarket Journal reported, ‘We record with sincerest regret the death of Dr. Sidney Winslow Woollett, who passed away at his residence, Kingston House, Newmarket, yesterday (Thursday) evening after a long illness, in his 72nd year’. Reference: The Newmarket Journal. Saturday Jun 9 1928: 5. [Note: see the page on Sidney Winslow Woollett for more details.]

1928, 16th June: Under the heading ‘Funeral of Dr. S. Winslow Woollett’ the Newmarket Journal reported amongst the ‘principal mourners’, aside from his widow and members of the family, ‘Dr J Davis (assistant)’ and in the floral tributes ‘A last remembrance of one who commanded my sincere respect and friendship – Dr J Davis (King-ston House)’. Reference: The Newmarket Journal. Saturday Jun 16 1928: 12.

1929:Davis Jsph. M.B., B.S.Durh. Physcn. & medical officer & public vaccinator No. 2 district, Newmarket union, Kingston ho. High st. TN 18’ listed in the Newmarket Commercial section of Kelly’s Directory. Reference: Kelly’s directory of the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. London: Kelly’s Directories Ltd.; 1929, pgs 354-368 Newmarket section. [Note: ‘Aylmer Mrs J. H. Kingston House’ is also shown and Percy Cooper is not], [Note also, the Grays & Hendley in Alton House (proto-Rookery), and John Maund in Heath Cottage (proto-Orchard House) are listed separately]

1929:Davis, Joseph… Kingston house, Newmarket, Suffolk’, registered 13th January 1925. Reference: The Medical Register. London: General Medical Council; 1929. [Note: he’s recorded in Newcastle in the 1928 register.]

1930:DAVIS, Joseph, Kingston House, Newmarket (Tel. Newmarket 18) – M.B., B.S. Durh. 1924; (Durh.); Med. Off. & Pub. Vacc. No. 2 Dist. Newmarket R.D.C.; Med. Ref. Colon. Mut. Life Austral.; Mem. B.M.A.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1930. [Note: this was the first year that he mentioned Newmarket, but see the Medical Register above.], [Note also, his address remained as Kingston House until 1938, when it changed to Rous Villa (see below).]

1933:Davis Jsph. M.B., B.S.Durh. physcn. (firm, Davis & Robinson), Kingston ho. TN 18’ and ‘Robinson Fredk. M.R.C.S.Eng., L.R.C.P.Lond. physcn. & surgn. (firm, Davis & Robinson), Kingston ho. TN 18’ listed in the Newmarket Commercial section of Kelly’s Directory. Reference: Kelly’s directory of the counties of Cambridge, Norfolk and Suffolk. London: Kelly’s Directories Ltd.; 1933, pgs 205-214 Newmarket section. [Note: Dr Robinson was in partnership with Dr Davis, but lived in Crockford’s Rd. –  see the page on Joseph (Joe) Davis for more details.]

1936: In the section divided up by streets, ‘Kingston House, Davis, Dr. Joseph. (Phone 18).’ in the Kingston Passage section, and in the alphabetical list of names, ‘Davis, Dr. Joseph, Kingston house, Kingston passage’. Reference: Newmarket & District Annual & Directory. Newmarket: Eastern Counties Supplies Ltd.; 1936-37 edition, pages 106 & 137. [Note: he’s the top of the list for Kingston Passage with Fredrick Williams of Malton House underneath, so apparently the wrong way round; also, there does not appear to have been anyone else in Kingston House at this stage and Mrs Aylmer is not in the directory.], [Note also, Dr Frederick Robinson is shown at his residential address in Crockford’s Rd.]

1937: ‘Aylmer Mrs. Malton house, High st’ (see 1920 above) and ‘Davis Joseph, Rous villa, Rous road’ listed in the Private Residents section of Kelly’s Directory, and in the Commercial section ‘Davis Jsph. M.B., B.S.Durh. Physcn. medical officer & public vaccinator to Newmarket Rural District Coun-cil, district No.2, Rous villa, Rous rd. TN 18’. Reference: Kelly’s directory of the county of Cambridgeshire. London: Kelly’s Directories Ltd.; 1937, pgs 215-223 Newmarket section. [Note: Malton House was occupied by Alfred Hayhoe in the 1929 Kelly’s Directory above (it’s on the west side of Kingston House – see the 1926 street directory also). Clearly both halves of Kingston House were vacated by 1937 – no-one is shown there in this Directory. Apparently it was used as a wartime operations centre during the war, then became The Marlborough Club before the Moon’s toy shop, see http://www.newmarketshops.info/No.85_High_Street.html for more details.]

1938:DAVIS, Joseph, Rous Villa, Newmarket (Tel. New-market 18) – M.B., B.S. Durh. 1924; (Durh.); Med. Off. & Pub. Vacc. No. 2 Dist. Newmarket R.D.C.; Mem. B.M.A.’ Reference: The Medical Directory. London: Churchill; 1938. [Note: this was the first year that he mentioned Rous Villa in the Medical Directory. See the pages on Joseph (Joe) Davis, Rous Villa and Rous Surgery for more details.], [Note also, his medical register address change lags behind this by some time.]

Some other sources consulted include:-

Shops History Newmarket. http://www.newmarketshops.info/index.html. [Note: I used this website as a significant source of information regarding the non-medical history of Kingston House, see http://www.newmarketshops.info/No.85_High_Street.html and the wider palace yard http://www.newmarketshops.info/James_I_&_Charles_I_Palace.html.], [Note also, newmarketshops.info has been supplied with information regarding the medical history of Newmarket by the author of talkingdust.net since August 2013 (see footnotes on some of the pages, including the No.85 page here). Both websites continue to be developed, and in this sense are mutually symbiotic.]

The Medical Directory. London: Churchill. [Note: Ernest Crompton does not mention his house name in the Medical Directories.], [Note also, this publication has been known by various titles over the years. Initially it just covered London, but from 1847 it had a wider remit, being variously known as the London and Provincial Medical Directory, The Medical Directories, The Medical Directory, etc., essentially the same work with minor variations and developments. It is usually referred to as The Medical Directory (as opposed to The Medical Register), so that is how it’s consistently referred to on talkingdust.net.]

The Medical Register. London: General Medical Council; 1859ff. [Note: Ernest Crompton does not give his house name in the Medical Register.]

Note: For published material referenced on this website see the ‘Acknowledgements for resources of published material’ section on the ‘Usage &c.’ page. The sources used for original unpublished documents are noted after each individual reference. Any census records are referenced directly to The National Archives, since images of these are so ubiquitous on microfilm and as digital images that they almost function like published works. Census records are covered by the ‘Open Government Licence’ as should be other such public records (see the ‘Copyright and related issues’ section on the ‘Usage &c.’ page for which references constitute public records, and any other copyright issues more generally such as fair dealing/use etc.).